Awesome “It Gets Better” Project
September 23, 2010

There is a new video project on YouTube that I found through Facebook via The Trevor Project and GLSEN posts – how’s THAT for Social Networking!

So here’s the deal (directly from the description on YT): “If you’re gay or lesbian or bi or trans, and you’ve ever read about a kid like Billy Lucas and thought, “Fuck, I wish I could’ve told him that it gets better,” this is your chance. We can’t help Billy, but there are lots of other Billys out there—other despairing LGBT kids who are being bullied and harassed, kids who don’t think they have a future—and we can help them….”

http://www.youtube.com/itgetsbetterproject

Here’s the background from Dan Savage, as it appears in his column “Savage Love” at http://www.thestranger.com/seattle/SavageLove?oid=4940874

I just read about a gay teenager in Indiana—Billy Lucas—who killed himself after being taunted by his classmates. Now his Facebook memorial page is being defaced by people posting homophobic comments. It’s just heartbreaking and sickening. What the hell can we do?

Gay Bullying Victim Who Survived

Another gay teenager in another small town has killed himself—hope you’re pleased with yourselves, Tony Perkins and all the other “Christians” out there who oppose anti-bullying programs (and give actual Christians a bad name).

Billy Lucas was just 15 when he hanged himself in a barn on his grandmother’s property. He reportedly endured intense bullying at the hands of his classmates—classmates who called him a fag and told him to kill himself. His mother found his body.

Nine out of 10 gay teenagers experience bullying and harassment at school, and gay teens are four times likelier to attempt suicide. Many LGBT kids who do kill themselves live in rural areas, exurbs, and suburban areas, places with no gay organizations or services for queer kids.

“My heart breaks for the pain and torment you went through, Billy Lucas,” a reader wrote after I posted about Billy Lucas to my blog. “I wish I could have told you that things get better.”

I had the same reaction: I wish I could have talked to this kid for five minutes. I wish I could have told Billy that it gets better. I wish I could have told him that, however bad things were, however isolated and alone he was, it gets better.

But gay adults aren’t allowed to talk to these kids. Schools and churches don’t bring us in to talk to teenagers who are being bullied. Many of these kids have homophobic parents who believe that they can prevent their gay children from growing up to be gay—or from ever coming out—by depriving them of information, resources, and positive role models.

Why are we waiting for permission to talk to these kids? We have the ability to talk directly to them right now. We don’t have to wait for permission to let them know that it gets better. We can reach these kids.

So here’s what you can do, GBVWS: Make a video. Tell them it gets better.

I’ve launched a channel on YouTube—www ­.youtube.com/itgetsbetterproject—to host these videos. My normally camera-shy husband and I already posted one. We both went to Christian schools and we were both bullied—he had it a lot worse than I did—and we are living proof that it gets better. We don’t dwell too much on the past. Instead, we talk mostly about all the meaningful things in our lives now—our families, our friends (gay and straight), the places we’ve gone and things we’ve experienced—that we would’ve missed out on if we’d killed ourselves then.

“You gotta give ’em hope,” Harvey Milk said.

Today we have the power to give these kids hope. We have the tools to reach out to them and tell our stories and let them know that it does get better. Online support groups are great, GLSEN does amazing work, the Trevor Project is invaluable. But many LGBT youth can’t picture what their lives might be like as openly gay adults. They can’t imagine a future for themselves. So let’s show them what our lives are like, let’s show them what the future may hold in store for them.

The video my husband and I made is up now—all by itself. I’d like to add submissions from other gay and lesbian adults—singles and couples, with kids or without, established in careers or just starting out, urban and rural, of all races and religious backgrounds. (Go to www.youtube.com/itgetsbetterproject to find instructions for submitting your video.) If you’re gay or lesbian or bi or trans and you’ve ever read about a kid like Billy Lucas and thought, “Fuck, I wish I could’ve told him that it gets better,” this is your chance. We can’t help Billy, but there are lots of other Billys out there—other despairing LGBT kids who are being bullied and harassed, kids who don’t think they have a future—and we can help them.

They need to know that it gets better. Submit a video. Give them hope.

mail@savagelove.net

So if you have a message you want to get through to our young people to give them hope for getting through their school experience, get a YouTube account and submit your video! -MsQueer

©2010 MsQueer.com. All rights reserved. (Note: Quoted material from other authors and websites remains the property of the original authors. )

Bookmark and Share

Stumble It!

Gay Blog Award
Add to Technorati Favorites

Advertisements

Another 11-year old Commits Suicide over Bullying
April 23, 2009

A second elementary school youth hanged himself last week after enduring anti-gay harassment and bullying at his school in Atlanta, Georgia. As in the case of Carl Joseph Walker-Hoover, Jaheem Herrera did not identify himself as “Gay.” But his classmates did.

I know I’ve used the phrase “epidemic proportions” here before, but ENOUGH IS ENOUGH!!!!

These comments are from GLSEN on YouTube along with some videos shown below:

“Almost 90% of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) students report being verbally harassed at school because of their sexual orientation. LGBT teens experience homophobic remarks and harassment throughout the school day, creating an atmosphere where they feel disrespected, unwanted and unsafe. Homophobic remarks such as thats so gay are the most commonly heard; these slurs are often unintentional and a common part of teens vernacular. Most do not recognize the consequences, but the casual use of this language often carries over into more overt harassment.

“This campaign aims to raise awareness about the prevalence and consequences of anti-LGBT bias and behavior in Americas schools. Ultimately, the goal is to reduce and prevent the use of homophobic language in an effort to create a more positive environment for LGBT teens. The campaign also aims to reach adults, including school personnel and parents; their support of this message is crucial to the success of efforts to change behavior.”

I’ve got my own plan as to how to counter-act this rising trend in our country’s public and private schools:

Find as many news sites and blogs that are covering this and related stories. TAKE TIME TO MAKE A COMMENT if available. Make sure you check the ability to receive email notification of responses.

Don’t just render an opinion – no matter how passionate it might be – offer web addresses of organizations working to educate and combat this insanity.

The more dialog we initiate, the more we will come together with others who share our concern. THIS IS NOT A GAY ISSUE. This is a SAFE SCHOOLS issue!  It affects all of us. OUR CHILDREN MUST HAVE A SAFE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Here’s additional news coverage of this repeat tragedy:

http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/dekalb/stories/2009/04/21/boy_suicide_bullying_decatur.html?cxntlid=homepage_tab_newstab

 

http://current.com/items/89987540_anti-gay-bullying-blamed-for-another-pre-teen-suicide.htm

 

Some websites that you can refer others to (include these in your comments and/or emails to others, please:

 

Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, www.glsen.org

 

Think B 4 You Speak, www.thinkB4youspeak.com

 

The Trevor Project, www.thetrevorproject.org

 

Here’s three great PSA’s from GLSEN and the AdCouncil about “That’s So Gay”  (include the url’s in your comments) – [NOTE: Videos propety of GLSEN. No Copyright infringement intended]

url: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sWS0GVOQPs0

 

url: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C277qAKpUaQ

 

url: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uEpBYKOs3ys

 

 

DON’T STOP THERE….Contact your local School Board to find out if they have an anti-bullying policy in place.

 

Write an editorial in your local paper…AND SEND IT!

 

 Here’s a statement issued by The Trevor Projects Exec Director, Charles Robbins:

“Everyone at The Trevor Project is deeply saddened to learn about the death of Jaheem Herrera last week in DeKalb County, Georgia. Our deepest sympathies and condolences are with his family and friends during this difficult time.

“Tragically, Jaheem is now the second young person to complete suicide as the result of anti-gay bullying at school in just over two weeks. Although Jaheem did not identify as gay, anti-gay slander was the epithet of choice by his classmates and peers. Defamatory language continues to erode the self-esteem of sexual orientation and gender identity, and its consequences can be fatal as this incident so clearly demonstrates. It is time for both bullying and suicide to be addressed as the public health crises that they are. We are working closely with our colleagues at GLSEN and other national organizations to bring increased visibility and focus to this critical issue.

“The Trevor Project remains committed to supporting public policy and government initiatives that will address suicide prevention programs in every classroom across America. We will also advocate for programs that teach young people to respect one another and learn about the impact of their words and behaviors in the hope of preventing another tragic loss of life. 

“To learn more about suicide prevention, warning signs and resources, please visit The Trevor Project’s Suicide Resources (http://thetrevorproject.org/info.aspx)”

Don’t just shake your head and say, “what a waste.”  MAKE SOME NOISE!!!!! 

 

 NOTE: Videos are sole property of GLSEN and The Ad Council.  The Trevor Project Press Release is sole property of The Trevor Project. GLSEN videos descriptions sole preperty of GLSEN and YouTube. NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED.

©2009 MsQueer.com. All rights reserved.

Bookmark and Share

Stumble It!

Gay Blog Award
Add to Technorati Favorites

YouTube Project-4-Awesome Vids Feature The Trevor Project
January 4, 2009

What better way to tell someone about why they should donate to the nation’s only 24-7 Helpline for LGBTQ Youth, The Trevor Project, than through the video-perspective of two young movie-makers who chose to highlight the non-profit for YouTube’s Project 4 Awesome 2008?

I personally cannot say enough about the work of  The Trevor Project and the urgent and overwhelming need to offer support to our LGBTQ youth, many of whom are bombarded by cruel verbal and physical assaults from classmates and family, not to mention the ignorance of society-at-large.

These two young men are articulate, passionate and focused. When I hear young peope speak about how stupid they think name-calling and prejudice against others really is, it gives me hope for the future of the human family. Witness for yourself:

For more information about this young Film-maker, see http://www.youtube.com/user/r0sewhip137

For more information about this film-maker, see http://www.youtube.com/user/tyleroakley

ALL RIGHTS BELONG TO THE ORIGINATORS OF THESE VIDEOS. I OWN NOTHING!

-MsQueer

The Attic is Philly’s Safe Haven for LGBTQ Youth
January 2, 2009

I love it when you, the readers, take time to share resources such as this one, which I discovered through the sharing of  “the hostess” in response to my “Study Shows Tolerance Lowers Gay Teen Suicide Rate” post recently. (That’s what I want this blog to be all about! So spread the word and contact me with your resources!)

The Attic Youth Center, at  South 16th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102  offers safe space and programs for empowering LGBTQ Youth.

It’s Mission, as stated on the website:  The Attic Youth Center creates opportunities for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (l/g/b/t/q) youth to develop into healthy, independent, civic-minded adults within a safe and supportive community, and promotes the acceptance of l/g/b/t/q youth in society.

It’s Vision: The Attic’s vision is one of inclusion where all individuals are valued and respected — a community where all young people have access to the resources they need to grow into healthy, independent, productive community members. The Attic’s mission and vision are supported by our multifaceted programmatic approach.

♥ PHONE: (215) 545-4331 ♥ EMAIL: info@atticyouthcenter.org   ♥

♥ WEBSITE: http://www.atticyouthcenter.org/index.php ♥

The Attic has published a list of resources for LGBTQ Youth for the Philadelphia area, other cities in Pennsylvania, as well as websites for national organizations and services.   See: www.atticyouthcenter.org/resources/General_Resource_List.pdf

In addition, while researching The Attic, I found an articulate article written by Sharon Cole regarding the decision by the Philadelphia School District to include Gay and Lesbian History Month in its 2006-2007 Academic Calendar.

Here is an excerpt:

The decision did not go unchallenged, however. According to reports in The Philadelphia Inquirer, school district officials received a deluge of irate e-mails and were visited by a few incensed parents who threatened to pull their kids from Philly public schools. But the district stood firm in its final decision stating, “We have our policy that says the district is committed to foster knowledge and respect for all.”

 

Though elated about the district’s inclusion, Carrie Jacobs, executive director and a founding member of the Attic Youth Center, an organization offering support and a safe haven for LGBT youth in center city Philadelphia, said the blatant intolerance of diversity displayed in response to the new calendar, of which 200,000 were distributed, made it all too clear just how far we are from true acceptance of gays and how desperately LGBT-identified youth need our support.

 

“There were people at the school commission reform who were so against gay history being printed on the calendars that it got to the point where some of them called other adults in the room faggots,” said Jacobs. “I was shocked by incredibly mean spirited it all was.”

 

Legacy of Neglected Youth

Shouting the term “faggots” is a pure example of the kind of verbal abuse anti-gay individuals impose upon others to cause fear, Jacobs said. Only when kids are the recipients, that fear can cause long-lasting damage. She explained that the name-calling causes oppression, and when that is coupled with a lack of education and awareness surrounding sexual orientation, social and emotional development can be

stunted for LGBT youth.

To read the article in its entirety, click here:  www.ct.gov/dcf/lib/dcf/wmv/news/protecting_our_kids.pdf

-MsQueer

©2009 MsQueer.com. All rights reserved. (NOTE: All language from The Attic website is the property of The Attic. All Rights to “Protecting Our Kids” belongs to the author. )

 


Bookmark and Share

For Parents of Gay Teens
December 16, 2008

So, what do you say when your child announces to you that she or he is “gay?” If you’re looking for the ultimate quintessential answer here out of desperation, you can quit reading now. There is no set “one line” or “approved script” of how to handle delicate interpersonal communications with loved ones – especially the “coming out” issue.

Suggestion: DON’T GO CRAZY. If you feel yourself launching into a judgement, take a moment to ask yourself, “Who’s that talking?”  Is what you may be about to spew all over your own flesh and blood something that you really subscribe to? Or might you be about to premanently render your relationship to your daughter or son altered irrevocably as the result of somebody else’s programs???????

What I mean here is that we all tend to act and react through “filters” – attitudes, opinions and automatic behaviors we have acquired throughout our lives, by observation, upbringing and conditioning (family, community, social-cultural influences, etc.) In other words, we as humans tend to interact with our world and each other as the sum total of the parts that we have taken on from other people in our lives  – almost like “valences” that may not necessarily be the real me or the real you.

But given a particular stimulus, BAM – before we can even think through the situation in front of us – up comes one of those “ghosts” – from somebody else’s past – (i.e. parents, clergy, teachers, authority figures) – like one of those annoying pop-ups that invade your computer screen and you really don’t want it, and don’t quite know how to get rid of it.

This is not to make any of those influence wrong. All those people that are part of our personal make-up are not “bad” – they just are not really us. They are “impressions” we hold onto because we don’t know how to release them without judgement and therefore guilt.

Letting go of Aunt Mary’s homophobia doesn’t make Aunt Mary a bad person – it just means she was expressing through her filters and influences in her life that she acquired…AND THE BEAT GOES ON! Making a choice to get free of that cycle and start a new one is choosing personal freedom and greater sanity.

In the case of being confronted with your teen’s “Coming out” – it can mean the difference between tragedy or triumph.

I found this article recently and wanted to share it with you:  Understanding Your Gay Teen,  A Primer for Parents by Katy Abel (see link below).

If you are a parent of a teen or any age daughter or son who has gone through the painful and fearful exercise of “coming out” to you, I implore you to treat this as a HUGE trust. Your child is looking for acceptance, not necessarily approval. You don’t have to understand the “gay experience” to love your child. Your child wants to know that no matter what, you still love them.

Think about it. They’re risking everything to be honest and open with you. They know from other people’s experiences that “honesty is the best policy” hasn’t always led to a “happy ending.”

Here’s some food for thought, and maybe insight into some of my “filters:” My father came from an Orthodox Jewish family. He fell in love with a woman 16 years his senior who was Lutheran. His family rejected her – and him. In fact, when it became clear that he was going to stand by his wife and not leave her as they had tried to convince him to do, they did the traditional week-long mourning period that follows burial of the dead.

For years there was no communication. When I was about 10 years old, a call came saying that his mother was dying of cancer and wanted to see my father and his family. So we went. It was very awkward, and very painful for my father. In the ensuing years, after his mother’s death, when he went to see his father there was a point in the visit where a silence would set in like a deep chasm that could not be bridged.

When my father died, he asked me not to inform his family until after he was buried. He carried hatred of his sister to his grave. And his pain. All I can say is, it is such a waste. There is nothing that should be more important than blood family – no religion, no philosophy, no politics, NOTHING.

Okay, end of soapbox. But you get the point. Looking back on the American Civil War we can all say “what a waste. Families torn apart, fathers and sons killing each other,  siblings against siblings…” So why would it make sense for any other issue? Let’s step away from the question at hand just far enough to realize that “from a distance” – as the song goes – we all are the same, and we all share far more in common than is justifiable in preserving the illusion of separation and “difference.”

See: Understanding Your Gay Teen, A Primer for Parents by Katy Abel

Additional resources are available through:

 PFLAG (Parents, Families & Friends of Lesbians and Gays) at: www.pflag.org

 Resources for Parents when talking to teens about homosexuality and gay teens, including:

3 Simple Things Parents of Straight Teens Can Do About Homosexuality
Parents of straight teens can do a lot to teach tolerance of gay teens.

My Teen Came Out to Me and I Blew It
Article for parents of gay teens who don’t feel that they have handled it well.

What should I say if my teen tells me he/she is gay, lesbian or bisexual?
Simple FAQ for parents of teens, what to say if your teen tells you he/she is gay lesbian or bisexual.

How Do I Accept My Gay Teen?
Don’t let yourself get confused between ‘accepting your teen’ and ‘accepting that your teen has a different sexual orientation’. This article will help.

Gayteens Resources
Support, information, features and chat rooms for young people, their families and those unsure of their sexuality.

http://parentingteens.about.com/od/gayteens/

Additional topics and authoritative compassionate articles are at this webpage for your assistance.

ADDENDUM: “For Parents of Gay/Lesbian Teens” gives an insightful view of what it feels like to be a parent dealing with discovering their teen’s gay identity.

See: http://www.teenhealthcentre.com/?q=node/53

better-gay-than-grumpy1

May your Christmas, Hannakah, Kwanza and other Holiday Celebrations

be filled with Love and Joy this year!

And may we all be able to celebrate each other as we are:

One with the All That IS.

🙂 MsQueer

©2008 MsQueer.com. All rights reserved.

Bookmark and Share

Trevor Project Accredited by American Society of Suicidology
December 11, 2008

The Trevor Project has been formally recognized as the only accredited crisis and suicide prevention program for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth .

Congratulations to The Trevor Project!  🙂 For more information go to www.thetrevorproject.org

From the Press Release issued by The Trevor Project: 
 LOS ANGELES (Nov. 14, 2008)  
 The Trevor Project, the non-profit organization that operates the only nationwide, around-the-clock crisis and suicide prevention helpline for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) youth, today announced that it is the only crisis and suicide prevention service delivery program specifically serving the LGBTQ community to be officially accredited by the American Association of Suicidology (AAS).  

This month, The Trevor Project was accredited by AAS, thus recognizing it as an exemplary crisis and suicide prevention program performing according to nationally recognized standards. In order to achieve accreditation, The Trevor Project was required to undergo a rigorous evaluation process, focusing on seven areas of performance: Administration and Organizational Structure, Training Program, General Service Delivery System, Services in Life-threatening Crises, Ethical Standards and Practice, Community Integration and Program Evaluation.

“Receiving accreditation from AAS affirms that, clinically, our crisis and suicide prevention services for young people are top-tier, and positions us as a model of program excellence for other crisis centers,” said Charles Robbins, executive director and CEO, The Trevor Project. “As the only accredited, LGBTQ-specific crisis and suicide prevention helpline, we know our services are vital and we will remain committed to expanding our programs and national outreach.”

This year has been one of tremendous growth for The Trevor Project. Call volume on The Trevor Helpline has increased more than 300% in the last year (2007 to 2008). Last month, The Trevor Project launched TrevorSpace.org, an online, social networking community for LGBTQ youth and their friends and allies. In September, The Trevor Project expanded The Trevor School Workshop Program in New York and Los Angeles, which uses a structured curriculum in schools to address topics around sexuality, gender identity, the impacts of language and behavior and what it means for young people to feel different. In addition, The Trevor Project unveiled a new social marketing campaign in September, to coincide with National Suicide Prevention Week, which is annually sponsored by AAS.  

The Trevor Project received accreditation from AAS just one month prior to its largest, annual fundraiser, Cracked Xmas, which is set for Sunday, Dec. 7 at The Wiltern Theatre in Los Angeles. The event is an evening of irreverent comedy, musical performances and awards to benefit The Trevor Project’s lifesaving programs, including the now-accredited helpline.

Suicide is one of the top three killers of young people, and LGBTQ youth are up to four times more likely to attempt suicide than their heterosexual peers. The Trevor Helpline receives more than 18,000 calls from young people in crisis each year. Volunteer counselors undergo more than 40 hours of training, learning to listen and understand without judgment.

Call volume on The Trevor Helpline typically increases during the winter holiday season, as many LGBTQ youth face additional challenges with family rejection and feelings of isolation and depression during the holidays. Young callers often call back after speaking with counselors on The Trevor Helpline to thank them. “I just want to thank you guys for having such an amazing helpline,” said one such 18-year-old caller. “I especially want to thank the counselor who talked to me, because his words truly saved my life.”  

About The Trevor Project

The Trevor Project is a 501(c)(3), non-profit organization that operates the only nationwide, around-the-clock crisis and suicide prevention helpline for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth. The Trevor Helpline, 866-4-U-TREVOR, is a free and confidential service that offers hope through its trained counselors. The Trevor Project also provides lifesaving guidance and vital resources to parents and educators in order to foster safe, accepting and inclusive environments for all youth, at home and at school. The organization was founded by three filmmakers whose film, “Trevor,” about a gay teenager who attempts suicide, received the 1994 Academy Award® for Best Short Film (Live Action). For more information please visit TheTrevorProject.org.  

 

 

-MsQueer©2008 MsQueer.com. All rights reserved. (NOTE: Press Release content is the property of The Trevor Project.)

Bookmark and Share

World Suicide Prevention Day and The Trevor Project
September 10, 2008

Today, September 10, 2008, has been proclaimed “Trevor Project Day” in the state of New York, to coincide with “World Suicide Prevention Day” and “National Suicide Prevention Week.”  I share this email which I receive from The Trevor Project. (If you wish to receive updates on their programs, you can request that at www.thetrevorproject.org). -MsQueer

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE EMAIL: trevor-day-announcement

Here’s a copy of the accompanying press release (reformatted to please the blog editor!):

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact:

Jacque Wing / The Trevor Project

310-271-8845, ext. 226

Jacqueline.Wing@TheTrevorProject.org

 

MEDIA ALERT

 

SEPT. 10 PROCLAIMED “THE TREVOR PROJECT DAY” IN NEW YORK

The Trevor Project Day to coincide with National Suicide Prevention Week and World Suicide Prevention Day

 

WHAT:

 

New York Gov. David Paterson will proclaim Sept. 10, 2008 as The Trevor Project Day in the state of New York. The Trevor Project operates the only nationwide, around-the-clock crisis and suicide prevention helpline for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. The Trevor Project Day strategically occurs during National Suicide Prevention Week, sponsored by the American Association of Suicidology. The day coincides with World Suicide Prevention Day, sponsored by the International Association for Suicide Prevention.

 

In recognition of National Suicide Prevention Week, World Suicide Prevention Day and The Trevor Project Day, The Trevor Project will launch and participate in a variety of initiatives to build awareness regarding suicide, specifically among LGBTQ youth. These include:

 

 

  • Launch of The Trevor Project School Workshop Program, which will use a structured curriculum in schools to address topics around sexuality, gender identity, the impacts of language and behavior, and what it means for young people to feel different.

 

  • Launch of an all-new “fan page” on Facebook.com promoting The Trevor Project, its mission and its services to members nationwide.

 

  • Volunteer counselors from The Trevor Helpline as well as staff members from The Trevor Project will participate in the Out of the Darkness Community Walk on Sat., Sept. 13 in Santa Monica, Calif., to benefit the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

WHEN:

 

National Suicide Prevention Week: Sept. 7 through 13, 2008

The Trevor Project Day: Sept. 10, 2008

World Suicide Prevention Day: Sept. 10, 2008

 

WHY:            

           

Suicide is one of the top three causes of death among young people (15 to 24-year-olds). Only accidents and homicides occur more frequently as causes of death among young people.

 

LGBTQ youth are up to four times more likely to attempt suicide than their heterosexual peers.

 

LGBTQ youth who come from a rejecting family are up to nine times more likely to attempt suicide than their heterosexual peers.

 

# # #

 

 


Bookmark and Share

www.gayteens.org
August 19, 2008

HERE IS ANOTHER RESOURCE WEBSITE FOR LGBT TEENS AND YOUTH. It is a comprehensive site that includes news from countries around the globe. It is a site written by and for young people. This is a great source of information, answers to common questions and is a wealth of resources 

taken directly from the home page: 🙂

From the editor

Welcome to the oldest, largest and established online LGBT International youth site. To interact with our community web site you will need to register. It’s free to join GTR all you need is a valid email address so that we can process your registration. With 11 years of service an incredable achievement when you think of it. That is dedication for you. As the founder I know the work is never complete and many of my aims and objectives have yet to be completed. The main purpose of the site is for young people to get involved and if they can put something back. This can be very simple from submitting local gay news or information that local members may benefit. Remember this is a global site. What is most important is that we publish information that will be helpful at a local, National or International level. The system in place can provide local information through our topics and Categories very easily and quick. Therefore gather some local information on your nearest gay youth group or even start a GTR streetmeet where local members meet up in a mass group one Saturday afternoon. The forums are a great way to start.

 


Bookmark and Share

Gay Homeless Youth, An OurChart Special Report featuring Katherine Moennig
August 14, 2008

In 2006 the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, together with  the National Coalition for the Homeless, issued a report on “Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Youth: An Epidemic of Homelessness.”

The Executive Summary of this report stated the following: 

“The U.S Dept of Health and Human Services estimates that the number of homeless and runaway youth ranges from 57,000 to 1.6 million per year. Our analysis of the available research suggests that between 20 percent and 40 percent of all homeless youth identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT). Given that between 3 percent and 5 percent of the U.S. population identifies as lesbian, gay, or bisexual, it is clear that LGBT youth experience homelessness at a disproportionate rate.”   (http://www.thetaskforce.org/downloads/HomelessYouth.pdf)
-MsQueer   

The following series of videos is a special original series on www.ourchart.com entitled 

“My Address: A Look at Gay Youth Homelessness”

featuring actress Katherine Moennig, who portrays Shane in the popular ShowTime series The L Word.

Part 1

Part 2

 

 

Part 3

 

Part 4

 

Part 5


Bookmark and Share